EXCERPTS FROM
THE HYPERMEMETIC GARDEN


A.
PREAMBLE TO THE INSTRUCTIONS ON
HOW TO UNDERSTAND THE CONSERVATORY
—-


The meaning of the term Hypermeme, as explained in the thesis “The Almanac of Homofecitophyta” is an amalgamation of several theories that interact with each other. The theory of Hyperreality elaborated by Jean Baudrillard, Memetics put forward by Richard Dawkins and Hyperobjects by Timothee Morton.

Memes elaborating on each oth- er are called Memeplexes. Memeplexes seen through the lense of Hyperobjects (Morton) are Hypermemes, which in the end are able to create realities (Baudrillard).

‘Hypermemes’ can be tangible thoughts, imitations that are extrapolated onto other media, materials and in turn imitated,

 
because ‘they are viscous, which means that they stick to beings that are involved with them’ and are ‘figments of the human imagination’. (Timothee Morton) 

The Thesis investigates hypothetical how far memes (according to Richard Dawkins), man-made information constructs, can reach a size that is no longer comprehensible to us (hyperobjects according to Timothy Morton) and are thus able to construct realities (Jean Baudrillard). In the thesis, these entities are defined as "hypermemes", to which the garden refers, but always acts representatively and is never itself a hypermeme.






B.
INSTRUCTIONS ON
HOW TO UNDERSTAND THE CONSERVATORY
—-


The Hypermemetic Garden investigates the relationship of humans with their environment and its tightly interwoven mesh of industrial and infrastructural production. It is a garden that questions and comments on the basic framework on which our material reality is based, and in doing so constructs realities, but also reveals their constructed nature.

The research that led to this project stems from an attempt to compare and contrast memes, with the conceptualisation of its namesake in The Selfish Gene (1976) by Richard Dawkins and their impact on the planet by looking through the lense of Hyperobjects by Timothy Morton and Representationalism by Jean Baudrillard.  

Alex Werth argues that cultural transmission is at the core of our understanding of the world,

that even something as seemingly inherently natural as plants are signified by classification and genealogy and therefore function as memes and memeplexes. 

The Hypermemtic Garden understands its plant life as objects that emerge as constructs using biological classification methods in order to be comprehensible, tangible and accessible. Material articulations herein are based on an analysis, observation and interpretation of industrial and infrastructural production - from tulip distribution centers to the crates designed to ship them. These objects grow into abstract and associative but - above all - representative artefacts which comment on the constructed nature of any reality which claims to be unquestionably itself.





C.
INTRODUCTION IN TO THE BOTANICAL TAXONOMY
OF THE CONSERVATORY
—-


Carl von Linné introduced the binary naming system at a time when plants were still named according to their characteristics, therefore it was not uncommon for these names to become sentence-long (the moss Funaria hygrometrica was called back then „Bryum aureum capitulis reflexis piriformibus, calyptra quadrangulari, foliis in bulbi formam congestis“) It was also not uncommon to name a plant twice out of scientist’s sheer vanity. In order to put an end to the prevailing madness, a code was developed from an association of many renowned biologists, based on Linné's work 'Plantarum', the forerunner of the current binary naming system, which is regulated by the 'International Code of Botanical Nomenclature’ (ICBN).

Interestingly, today names are still given by the researchers who describe the species scientifically for the first time (first description) and it is apparently frowned upon but still a thing to name species after themselves.

Botanical gardens, are glassed-in, temperature-controlled Simulacra, which shaded or additionally illuminated depending on the sunlight, are not only a place of past collecting frenzy, but also a

place of simulation of how a far distant land should look like in terms of flora and fauna, through the eyes of the explorers and researchers who were sent away by their kings and emperors to bring back small living treasures from the respective countries. Some of these rarities were further cultivated and cross-bred like the tulip in the netherlands. (mentioned by the addition in the name ‘cultivar’). 

The spread of botanical gardens in Europe is directly related to the history of colonisation. A place where one could enjoy and consume colonial hyperreality. Traces of this can be found today, especially in the older gardens, including the ancient herbaria, archives and rarities chambers.
 
For the general public, the names were most visible in botanical gardens, with large white letters on a small black plate, usually rammed into the ground. Displayed and proudly presented like a prized possession. Not only is the name of the species officially recognised by the ICBN issued, but also the finder who describes the plant for the first time, the quickest.

The Almanac serves as a kind of herbarium of the newly created representations of the Hypermeme entities.









EXCERPTS FROM THE THESIS ALMANAC OF HYPERMEME ENTITIES
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Mark